hülya n. yılmaz [sic]

My 60th B-Day Celebration

is a seasoned college instructor who views herself as a brutally slow-learning and therefore continually-suffering student of life. She finds consolation for such deficiency in creative writing. While the time hülya has dedicated to her academic career though spans over most of her life, the history of her literary work offers only a view over a modest number of years.

The literary language of her first choice is English, which is the second foreign language she has acquired; Turkish, her mother tongue follows in the second position. As for German – the first foreign language of her acquisition and the core element of her teaching objective, it comes in last. One other philosophers’ stone then reaches hülya at her freelance editor’s-desk, providing her with precious reading opportunities disguised as her clients’ manuscripts in different literary genres.

Trance, a collection of poems in English, German and Turkish (available from Inner Child Press, Ltd. and at Amazon) is hülya’s debut book of non-academic content. She hopes to edit and expand on this rather hastily compiled work of poetry of mostly personal nature some day (her haste, not her publisher’s). Throughout Trance, her own translations of her non-English poems appear in the book’s opposite pages. An Aegean Breeze of Peace (a publication of Inner Child Press, Ltd., also available at Amazon), which she has co-authored with Demetrios Trifiatis – a professor of Philosophy from Greece, is also a book of poetry. The Year of the Poet – now in its fourth year – is an international anthology to which hülya contributes with her poems every month, joining her Poetry Posse family, a large number of poets from various parts of the world.

Known by her family and within her closest friendship circle for her routine yearnings for opportune moments of time she can put on reserve outside the heavy demand on her daily schedule, responsibilities and commitments, hülya presently waits in patience (more or less) for a set of chances to begin to bring into completion her several writing projects.

Don’t just exist. Live. ~ hny, 2016
(A reminder more for myself than for others…)

44 responses to “hülya n. yılmaz [sic]

  1. Study me as much as you like, you will not know me.
    for I differ in a hundred ways from what you see me to be.
    Put yourself behind my eyes and see me as I see myself,
    for I have chosen to dwell in a place you cannot see.

    Like

    • Thank you, bhuwanchand, for your visit and your comment. I assume you, too, are a poet?!

      Like

      • Not really, just a learner, I love to read.

        Like

        • Actually, I didn’t mean to use the term “poet” regarding myself, either; for I believe the ultimate lyrical masters’ sense of their selves: “still a student…only a student”. It is very good to know you, too, feel that way.

          Like

          • 🙂 a pleasure to communicate with you.

            The ghazals that we in India commonly identify with have deep Sufi connections, written in beautiful Urdu language which originated in India (written in Persian script but is very similar to Hindi/Hindustani language). Its the musical expression of ghazals that I got exposed to early in the childhood. Rumi is still a long distance ahead for me to comprehend clearly, as I still struggle to understand Ghalib and others born much later here in India.

            Like

            • :o) I share the same sentiment with you…

              I read from Ghalib as often as I can. As for Rumi, not enough at all. I believe Ghalib will also be recorded in literary history as a timeless poet and writer. I wish I could read both in their literary languages, though – better yet, in their native tongues. In translation, after all, certain elements of fine and refined flavors tend to be either missed or lost altogether, if the translator is not one with a keen eye into the specific cultural entity’s core characteristics. Look at me, I am going on and on…it is quite a chore to stop me when the subject matter is Sufi ghazals. I thank you not only for visiting my blog site and for liking many of my posts but also for sharing your unique insight with me. I look forward to our communication again!

              Like

              • You are absolutely right, one needs to know the language in which they wrote to let their words go directly into the heart. Otherwise one can appreciate the beauty of their work from a distance. It is the language barrier which makes it a bit distant for me to truly absorb the essence of Rumi. Fortunately for me, Ghalib was born in India and I am able to understand his ghazals they way he wrote them, without the interpretation. I have tried to read the English versions (by different translators), although they try their level best to keep the essence of Ghalib’s message, the beauty of the words in original language gets totally missed out. Sample this “Blood flowing along through the veins doesn’t impress us, If blood doesn’t drop from the eyes, it’s not real blood” but what Ghalib wrote was “Ragon mein daudate phirane ke hum nahi qayal, jab aankh hi se na tapaka to phir lahu kya hai”. The translator had tried to capture the essence but it just doesn’t matches the rawness of Ghalib’s words. I guess its a short coming for any kind of literature when it gets translated into other languages.

                Come to thing of it, Ghalib’s wasn’t even thinking of or trying to leave any legacy behind, he was just trying to survive his life and wrote what he was experiencing in search of a little bit of happiness in his life.

                I do not know Persian language so can not read Ghalib in the language he has written, but I can understand Urdu and have been lucky to be able to listen to his Ghazals sung by an Jagjit Singh (Indian ghazal singer who passed away in 2011) Listen to him if you ever get a chance, I am sure you will understand it much better than any English translation.

                Like

                • You are aware of so much when it comes to this unique poetic expression of the self and “love” in the largest sense. I appreciate the fact that we have met! Another dear acquaintance had suggested to me to listen, just to listen to the Ghazals sung by Jagiit Singh (SP?) and I shall do so as soon as I have my act together. My gratitude comes to you for sharing with me your rare insight, knowledge but also for your love for poetry, especially, the musical beauty of Ghazals. I wish you a memorably good day!

                  Like

                  • Jagjit Singh is undoubtedly the best ghazal singer from India, there are arguably better ghazal singers in our neighbor Pakistan (Ghulam Ali, Mehdi Hasan) but Jagjit and Chitra (his wife) Singh’s ghazals of Mirza Ghalib, which were part of a TV series based on the poet’s life were a truly a masterpiece. Try it whenever you get the time. If you have trouble finding it, just let me know, I have it in my collection. Best wishes.

                    Regards

                    Like

                    • That you have such remarkable artists’ collection as one of your own is admirable. In the long time past, I had a collection of Sufi music (performed by Turkish artists but instrumentally only), “had” being the operable word here. I have left them behind. I am now excited to learn from you the diversity of the musical artists who have been performing the ghazals in such beautiful-sounding languages. I listened recently to Ghulam Ali (a dear colleague had given me the reference) – and waited until, so that I could write to you about it: so very moving, thrilling. But I intend to take much more time with the names you give me here, as the term goes: to do their art justice while also honoring the ghazals the way they should. Thank you again for your resourcefulness and your personal references!

                      Like

  2. Thank you for following my blog in return 🙂

    Like

  3. Hello Maa’m 🙂
    Thank you so much for stopping by my blog. It is not everyday one comes across learned folks like you. I was not even born when you started your doctoral studies 🙂
    Would be coming around more often now 🙂

    Tatsat

    Like

    • Hello Tatsat,

      (If I may address you with your signed name here – and please call me by my name)

      Thank you also for visiting my blog site and your kind words. I, too, hope to be reading more of your writings. Happy blogging in the meantime!

      hülya

      Like

      • Sure Hülya 🙂
        It might be the way we are brought up here in India. Popular culture dictates that in informal settings we do not call elders by name as such…
        But again, what good is a life if limited by his/her culture 🙂 So Hülya it will be.

        Been a pleasure 🙂

        Like

        • It is, or at least has been during my time, the same in my birth country when it came to the different forms of addressing someone. I immediately recognized the courtesy and respect behind your cordial direct reference to me. It can be certainly “ma’am” if that will make you more comfortable. However the form of address may be, it definitely has been a pleasure meeting you. I look forward to becoming more acquainted with your writings. All the best.

          Like

  4. Very nice to meet you here. Very impressive. 🙂 Paulette

    Like

  5. Pingback: SoundEagle in Best Moment Award from Moment Matters | SoundEagle

  6. Hi, how are you?

    Good news, we are giving you the “BEST MOMENT AWARD“. Congratulations and enjoy the rest of the day!

    Like

  7. My dissertation as well as my book, Das Ghasel des islamischen Orients in der deutschen Dichtung, focus on the literary influence of the Islamic East upon the 19th and 20th-century German literature through Anatolian Sufism. Therein lies the tie between my research background and Comparative Literature Studies.=== This is great. Does that mean your research was also discussing poetry by Rumi, Hulya? I love Rumi, he’s a great inspiration of mine.

    Also, here I hope it is not too late to wish you a wonderful New Year. May 2013 bring you more happiness, love, and success. I would like to thank you because you continue following my blog. I hope my blog posts do not disappoint and that your visits in there have been a joyful ride. Thank you again, many blessings and much love to you. 🙂

    Subhan Zein

    Like

    • Your blog posts, a disappointment? Not at all! They are a delight. As for my dissertation and book, yes, I have indeed researched Rumi’s ghazal poems in their influence on selected German poets. My focus was on his Divan. Rumi, I have found out in all the decades between my work’s completion and the present, has been an inspiration to countless people from all walks of life. Timeless gem of a poet, if I may dare to judge. Thank you for responding to my background regarding Rumi. Thank you also for your wishes for the new year. It is never too late to express what’s good in us to others. Your reaching out this way is much appreciated. All the best to you in 2013 also!

      Like

      • Tashakur, Professor. I read your comment with great delight. And thank you for showing your interest in my work. You may be interested in reading some of my poems, I suppose: ‘If you are fire, then your beloved must be water’ and ‘A wondrous nightingale’, for example. And I would love to hear your feedback, well of course, at anytime of your convenience. Tashakur ederim, many blessings and much love to you.. 🙂

        Subhan Zein

        Like

        • You have a unique way of warmth with which to reach out to others. I appreciate your kind words to and about me. I take delight in poetry that is composed under the influence of a timeless mystic such as Rumi. While I didn’t have a chance yet to read in calm your poems you mention here, I very much look forward to creating that time for myself. My “teşekkürler” to you also, and my best wishes for your continued poetic creativity.

          Like

  8. This blog’s been included in chain of nominations of Super-Sweet Blogging Award.
    http://stalkingdawn.wordpress.com/2012/09/17/some-nominations-part-1/

    Like

  9. I was just given a Liebster Blogging award by another blogger and I have included you in my list of 5 blogs who also deserve a Liebster. Check it out here if you care to take part in the Award. http://merlinspielen.com/2012/06/06/blogging-is-an-awarding-experience/
    Yes these awards are mostly about building audience and traffic so no pressure to participate if that doesn`t fit with your blogging approach. Just my way of saying thanks for the thoughtful posts – and hope more people come here to read your posts.

    Like

    • First of all, my sincere congratulations on your wonderful achievement of the Liebster Blogging award, merlinspielen! How exciting of a step! Then, I thank you, dear blogger friend for listing my blog and for the sincere enthusiasm in your words there. I appreciate your supportive act very much and will most certainly look into the Award site.

      Like

  10. fivereflections

    hello – nice to meet you
    David in Maine USA

    Like

    • Nice to meet you also, David in Maine USA. I am sorry for being this late in responding to your kind visit to my blog site before. Continued success with your writing! Hulya in PA USA

      Like

Thank you for stopping by.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s