For Education: Acts of Cowardice and an Act of Courage

Against the backlash of sickening shouts of joy by numerous Taleban followers during the execution-style shooting of a man amid a forced crowd – point-blank in the head – onto the ground where a headless corps lies and a girl screams while being flocked face down in dirt, all for a so-called lesson by a group of armed men, Malala Yousafzai’s voice rises in confidence: “They cannot stop me.  I will get my education. If it is in home, school or any place.”  All, in the video below.  The man’s head’s image revokes that of the imagined one of Malala in her school bus several months ago.

A statement from Seneca sums up the now widespread news on the cowardice behind the Talebani shooting of Malala in the head and chest: “All cruelty springs from weakness (Seneca’s Morals).”

No, oh no! It is not at all my intent to re-visit that low moment in Malala’s life beyond these words of reminder of her trauma.  For it is, rather, sharing of the most recent, joyous news that is most deserving of her strength: Being discharged from the hospital after her life-threatening wounds, having risen above the impact of the cowardly act by a shooter from the realms of ultra-conservative Islam as well as that of all its representatives.  Malala leaves hospital and addresses the world as the symbol of courage.

Various media speculations guide the reader and/or viewer to the potentiality of a plot behind the shooting of Malala, to which – among many others – “The assassination of Malala’s character,” an arab news article, responds.  Not being a political scientist of profession, of greater importance, though, not ever having cared for the value of any political structure at the level, let alone, above that of the human being, I, with my reflections today, am in obvious act of detest when the cowardice of the ultra-conservative Muslims is concerned – may they hide behind the name “Taleban” or under any other title.

The fact remains the one and the same: Malala wanted to have education be open to her and knew too well that the Koran did not ban her from pursuing it.  Talebani shooters had to face growing fear on account of her “act” of a learned individual: A passion to live under her terms; that is, to lead a life within her rights as a human being.  But also for being educated enough to know that the Holy Book of Islam she believed in was in support of her pursuit when it came to equal rights for education for Muslim boys as well as girls anywhere in the world.

Plutarch is claimed to have said the following regards education: “The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled.”  How relevant of a statement of wisdom when our days are taken into consideration in view of the mind (intended singularity) of the Taleban followers as opposed to that of Malala…

You, dear reader, may – in the words of Gandhi always possess passion and courage for education and thus, “[l]ive as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”

1 Comment

Filed under Reflections

One response to “For Education: Acts of Cowardice and an Act of Courage

  1. Pingback: The Question Of Character And Courage | We dream of things that never were and say: "Why not?"

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